Track 4 – Noise

Introduction

The WHO Environmental Noise Guidelines for the European Region provide guidance on protecting human health from harmful exposure to environmental noise. What does it really mean?

Talks:

Noise annoyance and WHO’s new Noise Guidelines from October 2018
by Torben Holm Pedersen, SenseLab, Force Technology

The WHO Environmental Noise Guidelines for the European Region provide guidance on protecting human health from harmful exposure to environmental noise. In this talk, we discuss the guidelines from WHO and how noise can affect your health.

Soundscapes
by Christer P. Volk, SenseLab, Force Technology

The term soundscape is defined in the standard DS/ISO 12913 part 1 as: “the acoustic environment as perceived or experienced and/or understood by a person or people, in context”. It infers a new way of thinking about a community area, which expands on the visual pleasantness, the sense of security, its level of activity and so on. Because the elements of a good soundscape are heavily context-depending traditional acoustical measurements are unsuited for capturing its qualities. SenseLab have in recent years developed a structured and qualified method of capturing a soundscape using local residents and city planners, which will be presented and its potential discussed.

How sounds of neighbors become noise
by Sandra Lori Petersen, Postdoc, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Copenhagen

The home shapes the base for most of us; it plays an existential role as a place to go out in the world from and redraw to. As sounds of neighbors seep through walls, ceilings and doors, they partake in shaping the home, and influence the inhabitant’s sense of homeliness, community, safety and health.

We know that sound influence individuals in complex ways. Volume of course, plays a role, but the contents of a specific sound as well as the context it appears in and the relationship one has for example to a specific neighbour are essential elements to consider when attempting to understand how even sounds of low volume can be experienced as noise nuisances challenging the privacy of the home.

Based on findings from the research project “What is neighbor noise?” this presentation will explore how the specific context of the home shapes inhabitants’ experiences of the sounds of others and point out tendencies as to why certain sounds are experienced as noise.

The project is undertaken primarily by anthropologist Sandra Lori Petersen and funded by Grundejernes Investeringsfond (Investment Fund of Landowners) and Realdania. Read more about the project here…

14.30-15.30

Seminar Room